diversity

The Tower of Babel

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Language_topic_image_Breugel%27s_Tower_of_Babel.jpg

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Language_topic_image_Breugel%27s_Tower_of_Babel.jpg

On this special week, guest speaker Rabbi Dorothy Richman opened up the story of the Tower of Babel, challenging the traditional Christian interpretation through a look at Jewish perspectives on the story.

Listen to the teaching below or review Dorothy's notes here.

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Generations Together

In this teaching, our own Connie Barker opens up a conversation on Generational Theory, considering how the call to be intergenerational might enhance and help fulfill the greater mission of Haven. Only the first 20 minutes were recorded; the rest of the time was group discussion. Listen below for a sense of what Connie brought for us to consider.

Revolution. Seriously.

William Joseph Seymour was an African-American man born in Louisiana in 1870.  His childhood was not an easy one.  His parents, Simon and Phyllis were former slaves.  William was the oldest in a large family that lived in abject poverty.  He grew up in a dangerous time for African-Americans in the south.  The KKK actively terrorized the blacks of southern Louisiana, and violence against them was extremely common.

Bubble Bursting

Bubble Bursting

I read an interesting article on Wired a while back called, “I Liked Everything I Saw on Facebook for Two Days. Here’s What It Did to Me.”  I found it kind of morbidly fascinating.  Just as an interesting non-scientific experiment the writer, Mat Honan, decided to try hitting the like button for everything that came up in his facebook feed.  He wanted to see what would become of the feed.  It was a chance to poke at the robots and algorithms behind the facebook magic, and see how they’d respond.